Most Popular Street Food in Kathmandu For the Best Food Experience

Most Popular Street Food in Kathmandu | For the Best Experience

This article will make your mouth water since we will be talking about the most popular street food in Kathmandu that one can try. Street food culture in Kathmandu, the capital city of Nepal, is known for its rich culture and diverse cuisine and is a vibrant and diverse part of the city’s food scene. Street food vendors can be found throughout the city, offering a wide variety of local and international dishes. Street food in Kathmandu ranges from traditional Nepali dishes, such as momo (dumplings) and chhoila (grilled or roasted meat), to international flavors, such as pizzas and burgers.

Street food in Kathmandu is often sold at small stalls or carts and is often served as a quick and convenient snack or meal. Street food vendors in Kathmandu offer a range of prices, making it accessible to people from all walks of life. In addition to being a popular source of food for locals and tourists alike, street food in Kathmandu is also an important part of the city’s cultural and social fabric, with vendors and customers often engaging in lively conversations and social interactions.

Classification of the most Popular Street Food in Kathmandu

Fried Street Food in Nepal

Sel-Roti

Sel roti is a traditional Nepali snack food made from rice flour. It is a sweet, deep-fried ring-shaped pastry that is often served with yogurt or milk. Sel-Roti is a popular snack food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. It is typically made by mixing rice flour with water, sugar, and a little bit of oil to form a dough.

The dough is then shaped into rings and deep-fried until golden brown. Sel-Roti is a staple food during the festival of Tihar, which is also known as Deepawali and is often made and shared with friends and family. It is also often served as breakfast or snack food.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Street stalls next to the Sleeping Vishnu in Budhanilkantha, Kathmandu

Nepali Style Sel-Roti

Samosa

These are fried pastries in the shape of triangles that are stuffed with meat or veggies. In Kathmandu, they are a preferred snack dish. Samosas are simple to pick up if you’re in a rush and need a quick snack because the stores sell them already made. In Nepal, samosas are mostly vegetarian, but if you have dietary needs, ask ahead of time.

Typically, they contain spiced potato, onions, peas, and dough that has been wrapped around the filling before being cooked. They come with a sweet and sour sauce on the side.

Recommended Samosa Place: Tip Top Sweets, Indrachwok, Kathmandu

Most Popular Street Food in Kathmandu For the Best Food Experience

Kachori

Kachori is a popular snack food in India and Nepal. It is a deep-fried pastry made from flour and filled with a variety of savory fillings, such as spiced lentils, chickpeas, or potatoes. Kachori is often served with chutney or yogurt on the side. It is a popular street food in many cities in India and Nepal and can be found at many street food stalls and vendors.

Kachori is also often served at festive occasions and celebrations. There are many variations of kachori, and the fillings and flavors can vary from region to region. Some common variations include moong dal kachori, aloo kachori, and khasta kachori.

Recommended Samosa Place: Street stalls next to the Sleeping Vishnu in Budhanilkantha, Kathmandu

Nepalese Kachori

Aaloo Chop

Aaloo chop is a popular snack food in Nepal. It is a deep-fried snack made from mashed potatoes and spices, shaped into a ball or patty, and then coated in a spiced gram flour (besan) batter and deep-fried until golden brown. Aaloo chop is a popular street food in Nepal and can be found at many street food stalls and vendors.

It is often served with chutney or yogurt on the side. Aaloo chop is a popular snack food for any occasion and is often served at parties and gatherings. It is also a popular breakfast or snack food in Nepal. In addition to being a snack food, aloo chop can also be served as a main dish, often accompanied by rice and vegetables.

Recommended Aaloo Chop Place: Street stalls next to the Sleeping Vishnu in Budhanilkantha, Kathmandu

Pakoda

Pakoda is a very popular snack food in Nepal often served with chutney or yogurt on the side. It is a deep-fried snack made from a variety of ingredients, such as vegetables, lentils, or cheese, coated in a spiced gram flour (besan) batter and then deep-fried until golden brown. There are many variations of pakoda, and the ingredients used can vary based on regional preferences and availability. Pakoda is popular street food in many cities in India and Nepal and can be found at many street food stalls and vendors.

Recommended Pakoda Place: Street stalls next to the Sleeping Vishnu in Budhanilkantha, Kathmandu

Pakoda (Mixed Veg)

Fish Fry

Fish fry is a popular dish in many countries around the world, including Nepal. It is a dish made by coating fish in a seasoned flour or breadcrumb mixture and then deep-frying it until it is crispy and golden brown. Fish fry is often served as a snack or appetizer, and can also be served as a main dish, accompanied by sides such as rice or potatoes.

There are many variations of fish fry, and the type of fish used and the seasoning mixture can vary based on regional preferences and availability. Some common types of fish used for fish fry include cod, haddock, and tilapia. Fish fry is often served with a variety of dipping sauces, such as tartar sauce or cocktail sauce. It is a popular dish in Nepal and is often served at restaurants and street food stalls.

Recommended Fish Fry Place: Tareba Sekuwa Corner

Sweet Street Foods in Nepal

Donut

A donut, also known as a doughnut, is a sweet, fried pastry that is popular in many countries around the world. Donuts are typically made by mixing flour, sugar, eggs, and milk to form a dough, which is then rolled out and cut into circular or ring-shaped pieces. The dough is then deep-fried until it is golden brown and cooked through. Donuts are often topped with a variety of sweet toppings, such as glaze, frosting, sprinkles, or chocolate.

They can be filled with a variety of sweet fillings, such as jam, cream, or custard. Donuts are a popular snack food and are often served at breakfast or as a dessert. There are many variations of donuts, and the specific ingredients and toppings used can vary based on regional preferences and cultural traditions.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Street stands on the main pathway in Bandipur

Chiya Donut

Malpua

Malpuwa is a traditional Nepali snack food made from flour, sugar, and ghee (clarified butter) which are more like donuts. It is a sweet, deep-fried pastry that is often served with tea or coffee. Malpuwa is a popular snack food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. It is typically made by mixing flour, sugar, and ghee to form a dough, which is then rolled out and cut into small, flat circles.

The dough is then deep-fried until it is golden brown and cooked through. Malpuwa is a sweet and indulgent snack that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. In addition to being a snack food, malpuwa can also be served as a dessert, often accompanied by ice cream or sweetened yogurt.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: A little shop near the intersection of Bishal Nagar Marg and Handigaun Marg near the Krishna Temple

Malpuwa

Jerry (Jalebi)

Jalebi is a sweet and syrup-soaked dessert that is popular in many South Asian countries, including Nepal. It is made by deep-frying a wheat flour batter in circular shapes, then soaking them in a sugar syrup flavored with cardamom, saffron, and rose water. The result is a crispy, golden-brown treat with a soft, chewy interior and a sweet, fragrant flavor. Jalebi is often served hot or warm and is commonly enjoyed as a snack or dessert.

It is sometimes served with a side of yogurt or milk, and it can also be garnished with nuts or dried fruit. In Nepal, jalebi is a popular sweet that is often enjoyed during festivals and special occasions.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Tip Top Sweets in Kathmandu

Nepalese Style Jerry

Jeri Puri Curry

Jeri puri curry is a traditional Nepali dish made with jeri, a snack food made from thin, crispy sweet dish, and puri, a type of deep-fried bread. The jeri is typically served in a spiced curry or gravy, along with the puri on the side. Jeri puri curry is often served as a main dish, accompanied by rice and vegetables.

It is a popular dish in Nepal and is often served at festivals and celebrations. Jeri puri curry can vary in terms of the specific spices and ingredients used, and the recipe may vary from region to region and from household to household. It is a hearty and flavorful dish that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Street stalls next to the Sleeping Vishnu in Budhanilkantha, Kathmandu

Jerry Puri Curry

Jeri Swari

Jeri Swari is yet another way to enjoy the delicious sweet. Swari is a fried flat bread which has a softer consistency than puri. Jeri swari is often enjoyed in the morning with tea. This is more of a sweet dish but the swari helps to tone down the sugar. Our favorite place to get this is a little shop near the intersection of Bishal Nagar Marg and Handigaun Marg near the Krishna Temple. The shop is on Bishal Nagar Marg on the right side if you are facing away from the temple. It’s popular among locals, so if you’re there in the morning, you’ll likely see a line out front.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: A little shop near the intersection of Bishal Nagar Marg and Handigaun Marg near the Krishna Temple

Lakhamari

The name “lakhamari” comes from the Nepali word “lakh,” which means “hundred,” and “mari,” which means “pieces.” Lakhamari is a traditional Nepali, specially Newari sweet made from flour, sugar, and ghee (clarified butter). It is a sweet, deep-fried pastry that is often served with tea or coffee. Lakhamari is a popular snack food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors.

It is typically made by mixing flour, sugar, and ghee to form a dough, which is then rolled out and cut into small, flat circles. The dough is then deep-fried until it is golden brown and cooked through. In addition to being a snack food, lakhamari can also be served as a dessert, often accompanied by ice cream or sweetened yogurt.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: A little shop near the intersection of Bishal Nagar Marg and Handigaun Marg near the Krishna Temple

Lakhamari

Yomari

Yomari is a traditional Newari sweet made from rice flour and filled with a sweet filling made from molasses or brown sugar shaped like a fish or a crescent moon.  It is typically made by mixing rice flour with water to form a dough, which is then filled with the sweet filling and shaped into the desired form.

The dough is then steamed or fried until it is cooked through. It’s filled with “chocolate” but not the kind of chocolate we have in America. It’s a kind of molasses made from sugar cane and ghee. Yomari is a sweet and indulgent snack that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. It is often served as a snack or dessert, and is also a popular food during the festival of Yomari Purnima, which is celebrated in Nepal.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: 

Yomari

Juju Dhau (King Curd)

Juju Dhau is a traditional Nepali dairy product made from buffalo milk. It is a type of sweetened, flavored curd that is often served as a dessert or snack. Juju Dhau is a popular food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. It is made by heating buffalo milk and adding a starter culture of lactic acid bacteria to curdle it.

The curds are then drained, flavored with sugar and various aromatic spices and herbs, and packed into clay pots or other containers. Juju Dhau is a rich and creamy dairy product that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. It is often served as a topping for desserts, such as rice pudding or jalebi, or can be eaten on its own as a snack.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Small street stalls all over Bhaktapur (just look for the King Curd signs out front)

Juju-Dhau [Bhaktapur]

Paan

Paan is a traditional mouth freshener that consists of a mixture of ingredients such as areca nut, tobacco, and various sweeteners and flavorings wrapped in a betel leaf. It is a popular snack in Nepal, India and other countries in the region. The ingredients and flavorings used in paan can vary based on regional preferences and cultural traditions.

Paan is often consumed after meals as a digestive aid and is also sometimes used as a breath freshener. It is a popular snack in Nepal and can be found at many street food stalls and vendors. Paan is often sold pre-made or can be made to order, with the customer choosing the specific ingredients and flavorings to be included.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: A little shop on the corner where Pashupati Road, Charkhal Road, and Thirbum Marg meet (across the street from Lunch Time Restaurant & Bar on Google Maps)

Paan Masala

Savory Street Food in Nepal

Choila

Chhoila is a traditional Newari dish made from grilled or roasted meat, typically buffalo or chicken, or a vegetable option like mushroom seasoned with spices and herbs. It is a popular snack food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. Chhoila is typically made by marinating pieces of meat in a mixture of spices and herbs and then grilling or roasting them until they are cooked through.

The meat is then sliced or diced and served with rice and vegetables on the side. Chhoila is a flavorful and spicy dish that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. It is often served as a main dish, accompanied by rice, with chiura (beaten rice) and vegetables, and is also a popular snack food.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: 3G Honachaa

Choila
Newari Style Chhoila

Chatamari

Chatamari is a traditional Newari style pizza made from a thin crepe made from rice flour and filled with meat, vegetables, or eggs. It is a popular street food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. Chatamari is typically made by mixing rice flour with water to form a thin batter, which is then poured onto a hot griddle or pan and cooked until it is set. The crepe is then filled with a variety of ingredients, such as minced meat, diced vegetables, or scrambled eggs, and topped with a variety of toppings, such as diced tomatoes, onions, and herbs.

Recommended Chatamari Place:

Chana

Chana is a term that is used to refer to a type of legume called chickpeas in Nepal. Chana is a mix of chickpeas, spices, and chili which is often eaten with some kind of bread like puri or beaten rice (chiura) and are high in protein and fiber and are a good source of various nutrients.

Chana can be found in many forms, including dried, canned, and frozen, and can be used in a variety of dishes, both sweet and savory. In Nepal, chana is often used in dishes such as chana masala, a spicy chickpea curry, and chana dal, a lentil and chickpea dish. It is also a popular snack food, often served with chutney or other dips.

Recommended Chana Place: Tip Top Sweets

Kathi Rolls

Kati rolls are a popular street food in India and Nepal, consisting of a filling wrapped in a paratha, a type of flatbread. The filling for a kati roll can vary and can include a variety of ingredients, such as meat, vegetables, and eggs. Kati rolls are often served as a snack or a light meal and are a popular food at street food stalls and vendors.

They are typically made by heating a paratha on a griddle or pan, adding the filling, and then rolling it up to form a cylindrical shape. Kati rolls are a flavorful and convenient snack that is enjoyed by many people in India and Nepal. They can be found in many cities in the region and can be made with a variety of fillings to suit different tastes and preferences.

Recommended Kathi Rolls Place: Syanko Kathi Rolls, Kathmandu

Roti Tarkari

Roti tarkari is a traditional Nepali dish made with roti, a type of flatbread, and tarkari, a vegetable curry. Roti is a type of unleavened flatbread that is made from wheat flour, water, and a little bit of oil and is cooked on a griddle or pan. Tarkari is a vegetable curry made with a variety of vegetables, such as potatoes, peas, and carrots, cooked in a spiced tomato-based sauce.

Roti tarkari is a popular and widely available dish in Nepal and is often served as a main meal, accompanied by rice and other side dishes. It is a flavorful and hearty dish that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. Roti tarkari can be found at many restaurants and street food stalls in Nepal and is often made with a variety of vegetables to suit different tastes and preferences.

Recommended Roti-Tarkari Place:

Chaat

Chaat is a popular snack food in India and Nepal that consists of a variety of ingredients, such as potatoes, chickpeas, and yogurt, mixed together and served with a variety of toppings, such as tamarind chutney, sev (a type of fried snack made from gram flour), and chaat masala (a blend of spices). It is a popular street food in many cities in the region and can be found at many street food stalls and vendors.

Chaat is typically served as a snack or appetizer, and can also be served as a light meal. There are many variations of chaat, and the specific ingredients and toppings used can vary based on regional preferences and cultural traditions. Some common variations of chaat include aloo chaat (made with potatoes), chana chaat (made with chickpeas), and pani puri (small, crispy shells filled with a variety of ingredients).

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Tip Top Sweets

Pani Puri

Pani puri is one of the most famous street foods in Nepal that consists of small, crispy shells filled with a mixture of ingredients, such as potatoes, chickpeas, and yogurt, and served with spicy water. It is mostly popular among Nepali girls. It is a popular street food in many cities in the region and can be found at many street food stalls and vendors.

The small, crispy shells of pani puri are filled with a variety of ingredients, such as boiled potatoes, boiled chickpeas, diced onions, and spices, and are then topped with spicy water made from a mixture of spices, herbs, and tamarind. Pani puri is typically served as a snack or appetizer, and can also be served as a light meal.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place:

Nepali-style Pani puri – street food in Nepal

Sekuwa

Sekuwa is a traditional Nepali dish that consists of grilled or roasted meat, typically marinated with spices and herbs. It is often made with lamb, goat, chicken, or pork, and can be served as an appetizer or main course. Sekuwa is typically prepared by skewering the meat and cooking it over an open flame or grill, and it is often served with rice and vegetables on the side.

The marinade for sekuwa may include a variety of spices such as cumin, coriander, garam masala, and chili powder, as well as ingredients like yogurt, ginger, garlic, and lemon juice. Sekuwa is a popular street food in Nepal and is also commonly served at festivals and special occasions.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Michael Baje ko Sekuwa Pasal: Shankhamul, Kathmandu

Bara

Bara is another Newari treat that’s popular in Kathmandu at street stalls and restaurants. Bara is a lentil pancake. It’s often served after puja (worship) as part of Sagun (holy food). It’s best if you dip it into a curry as it has a very mild flavor by itself. You can try this at street stalls like Honacha, but they only serve a few items a day and it isn’t always on the menu. You can also get it from a restaurant like Bhumi in Kathmandu. Bara is a traditional Nepali snack food made from lentil flour and spices. It is a savory, deep-fried snack that is often served with chutney or yogurt on the side.

Bara is a popular snack food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. It is typically made by mixing lentil flour with water and a variety of spices to form a dough, which is then shaped into small balls or patties and deep-fried until golden brown and cooked through. Bara is a flavorful and savory snack that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. In addition to being a snack food, bara can also be served as a main dish, often accompanied by rice and vegetables.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place: Honacha in Patan

Sausage

Sausages are a type of food made from ground meat, typically pork, beef, or poultry, mixed with a variety of spices, herbs, and other ingredients and encased in a casing made from the animal intestine or synthetic material. Sausages are a popular food in many countries around the world and are often served as a main dish, appetizer, or snack.

They can be cooked in a variety of ways, including grilling, frying, or boiling, and are often served with a variety of side dishes, such as potatoes, rice, or vegetables. Sausages come in many different varieties and can be flavored with a wide range of spices and herbs to suit different tastes and preferences. Some common types of sausages include frankfurters, bratwurst, chorizo, and kielbasa.

Recommended Sel-Roti Place:

Tibetan Street Food in Nepal

Laphing

Laphing is a traditional Tibetan and Nepali snack food made from mung bean or potato starch noodles that are tossed in a spicy sauce. It is a popular street food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. Laphing is typically made by boiling mung bean or potato starch noodles until they are cooked through, and then tossing them in a sauce made from chili paste, vinegar, and other spices and herbs.

Laphing is a spicy and flavorful snack that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. It is often served as a snack or appetizer, and can also be served as a light meal, accompanied by rice and vegetables. Laphing is a popular snack food in Nepal and can be found in many cities in the region.

Recommended Laphing Place:

Tibetan style Laphing – street food

Momo

Momo is a traditional Tibetan and Nepali snack food made from flour dough filled with a variety of ingredients, such as minced meat, vegetables, or cheese. It is a popular street food in Nepal and is often sold at street food stalls and vendors. Momo is typically made by mixing flour with water to form a dough, which is then rolled out and cut into small circles.

The circles of dough are then filled with a variety of ingredients, such as minced meat, vegetables, or cheese, and then folded over to form a dumpling. Momo is then steamed or fried until it is cooked through. Momo is a flavorful and savory snack that is enjoyed by many people in Nepal. It is often served as a snack or appetizer, and can also be served as a main dish, accompanied by a variety of sauces or dipping sauces.

Recommended Momo Place: Hungry Jack, Kathmandu

Most Popular Street Food in Kathmandu For the Best Food Experience

Syabhale

Shafala is one of my favorite street foods. This Tibetan dish is minced meat inside of a deep-fried dough. My favorite place to get them is just outside of the Tibetan Refugee Camp in Pokhara which is located near Devi Falls on the way to the Peace Pagoda. The restaurant is called Tibetan Yak. This tasty snack comes with either a chicken or buff (buffalo) filling. I personally prefer the chicken version as I rarely eat buffalo.

Recommended Suabhale Place:

Drinks to Try in Kathmandu

Lassi

Lassi is a traditional South Asian drink made from yogurt, water, and a variety of flavorings, such as fruit, spices, and sweeteners. It is a popular drink in India, Nepal, and other countries in the region and is often served as a refreshing and thirst-quenching beverage. Lassi is typically made by blending together yogurt, water, and any desired flavorings, such as fruit, spices, and sweeteners, until it is smooth and creamy.

Lassi can be served sweet or savory, and the specific ingredients and flavorings used can vary based on regional preferences and cultural traditions. Some common variations of lassi include mango lassi, made with mango and sugar, and mint lassi, made with mint and sugar. Lassi is a popular and widely available drink in Nepal and can be found at many restaurants and street food stalls.

Recommended Lasssi Place: Indrachwok, Kathmandu

Nepalese-style lassi from Indrachwok

Nepali Chiya

Nepali chiya, also known as chiya or chai, is a type of tea that is popular in Nepal and other countries in South Asia. It is typically made by boiling black tea leaves with milk, water, and a variety of spices, such as cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves, to create a strong and flavorful tea.

Nepali chiya is often served sweetened with sugar or honey and is enjoyed by many people as a refreshing and invigorating beverage. It is a popular drink in Nepal and is often served at restaurants, cafes, and street food stalls. Nepali chiya is a traditional drink in Nepal and is often served to guests as a sign of hospitality. In addition to being served as a standalone beverage, Nepali chiya is also often enjoyed with snacks such as Sel-roti or roti (flatbread).

Recommended Nepali Chiya Place: Daari Bhai ko Chiya Pasal: Shankhamul, Kathmandu

Nepali Style Milk Tea (Chai)

Butter Tea

Butter tea is a traditional Tibetan and Himalayan beverage made from tea leaves, butter, and salt. It is a popular drink in Tibet, Nepal, and other countries in the region, and is often served as a refreshing and invigorating beverage. Butter tea is typically made by boiling tea leaves with water to create a strong tea, which is then mixed with butter and salt to create a creamy and flavorful beverage.

The specific proportions of tea, butter, and salt can vary based on personal preference and cultural traditions. Butter tea is often served hot and is enjoyed by many people as a warming and nourishing drink. It is a popular drink in Tibet and Nepal and is often served at restaurants, cafes, and street food stalls.

Recommended Butter Tea Place:

Nepalese Style Butter Tea

Also, Check Out: 

20 Best Restaurants in Thamel, Kathmandu | Food Hunting

15 Most Popular Newari Food Items in Kathmandu

Top 7 Best Local Alcoholic Drinks in Nepal | Gongo Hunt

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